Monday, August 14, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Dennis Collection of Stereoscopic Views

DENNIS COLLECTION OF STEREOSCOPIC VIEWS is a massive collection of stereographs spanning the mid 19th century to the mid 20th century.
Contents: This amazing collection of over 40,000 photographs includes locations from around the world. Users can search by topic, place, genre, and other categories.
Classroom Connections: Librarians will find this public domain collection useful when connecting photographs to historical places and events. Mine the collection for photos matching specific topics in the history curriculum. Ask students to select a photo as the basis for a history project focusing on a particular time and place.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Book Review: I Promise

I PROMISE by David McPhail is a beautifully illustrated picture book featuring a mother bear and her cub.
This charming story follows a bear and her cub as they spend the day exploring the forest. Along the way, the cub learns about the meaning of the word “promise”.
Librarians will find this sweet story has a useful message that can be effectively woven into the primary grade curriculum.
To learn more about the author/illustrator, go to http://davidmcphailillustrations.com/.
Published by Little, Brown for Young Readers, an imprint of Hachette on March 7, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Immigration to the US, 1789-1930

IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES, 1789-1930 explores the aspirations, acculturation, and impact of immigrants through a wide range of primary source documents.
Contents: Part of Harvard University Library’s open collections programs, this digital collection features historical materials from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. In addition to browsing for digital objects, users can explore materials by topic including the immigrant diaspora, new lives, and restricting immigration.
Classroom Connections: History and social studies teachers will find a wealth of useful resources in this collection that connect directly to the standards. Of particular note are the many acts and other legal documents associated with immigration. In addition, students will enjoy the diaries, photographs, and other documents related to the everyday lives of immigrants.
To visit the collection, go to http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/immigration.

Monday, August 07, 2017

Digital Spotlight: American Archive of Public Broadcasting

AMERICAN ARCHIVE OF PUBLIC BROADCASTING shares historic programs of publicly funded radio and television in the United States.
Contents: Users can browse the collection such as agriculture, dance, energy, fine art, or literature. Another option is to explore curated exhibits on topics such as climate change and the Civil Rights Movement. Students can also explore content by participating organization.
Classroom Connections: Librarians will find quality programs across the curriculum. Partner with teachers to identify audio and video segments that match specific curriculum needs.
To visit the collection, go to http://americanarchive.org.

Sunday, August 06, 2017

Book Review: Baby on Board

BABY ON BOARD: HOW ANIMALS CARRY THEIR YOUNG by Marianne Berkes shares the many ways mothers carry their offspring.
Featuring a wide array of animals, the picture book begins by asking children to think about how they were carried as a baby. Rhyming verses describe the relationship between animals and their young, while the realistic illustrations provide visual detail. Background information is also provided for each animals. The book concludes with a matching game for children, ideas for teachers and parents, and additional resources.
Librarians will find that this book fits well with the primary grade science curriculum.
The publisher website provides free activities at https://dawnpub.com/our-books/baby-on-board/.
Published by Dawn Publications on March 1, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, August 04, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Discovering Literature: Shakespeare

DISCOVERING LITERATURE: SHAKESPEARE from the British Library is a digital collection and educational resource focusing on Shakespeare’s plays.
Contents: This resource features digital objects from the British Library. Users can explore the materials by works, articles, collection items, themes, teaching resources, and a person area. The works section features 15 plays. The articles area provides nearly 100 articles written by scholars, performers, curators, and journalists focusing different aspects of Shakespeare and his works. The collection section provides easy access to collection items. The themes area explores themes such as comedies, tragedies, histories, and more. The Shakespeare biography page includes links to many collection resources. The teacher resources contains a couple dozen lesson plans and resources.
Classroom Connections: Librarians and English teachers will find that these high quality digital objects and supplemental materials are useful additions to the English curriculum. Use the themes section to immerse students in a variety of works related to topics of interest from ethnicity to interpretations of madness.
To visit the collection, go to https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Website Review: Spread of U.S. Slavery

SPREAD OF U.S. SLAVERY is an interactive map showing enslaved populations in the United States from 1790 to 1860.
Using U.S. Census data, this easy to use interactive map helps users visualize the spread of slavery from the late 18th to the mid 19th century in the United States. In addition to viewing enslaved populations, users can also view free African Americas, free populations, and total populations.
Librarians will find this simple to use map useful in teaching students about data and visualizations. In addition, it is useful in the history and social studies curriculum.
To visit the website, go to http://lincolnmullen.com/projects/slavery/.

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Book Review: Insects

INSECTS: THE MOST FUN BUG BOOK EVER by Sneed B. Collard is a nicely organized informational book exploring the science of bugs.
Although presented in a picture book format, this work of nonfiction is a well-research science book featuring a conversational narrative, detailed explanations, and age-appropriate humor. The high-quality close-up photographs and useful sidebar notes add to the visual appeal.
Organized into very short chapters, the book contains a table of contents and index that are easy for children to use. In addition, the author provides a learn more section, information about insect names, and a glossary.
Although many bug books already fill library shelves, librarians will find this book to be a worthwhile addition. Short chapters focusing on key concepts such as defense and chemical communication make it particularly useful for student research projects.
To learn more about the author, go to http://www.sneedbcollardiii.com/.
Published by Charlesbridge, an imprint of Random House on March 21, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, July 28, 2017

Website Review: Confronting Violence

CONFRONTING VIOLENCE: IMPROVING WOMEN’S LIVES is an online exhibition exploring the history of women’s health issues.
Produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, this fascinating online exhibition explores issues in domestic violence and women’s health through history. The exhibition contains six sections: introduction, generations of reformers, nurses take a stand, medicine confronts violence, change is possible, and the work continues. Each section features a short narrative along with primary source documents. The digital gallery provides easy access to a wide range of documents, images, and other materials. The education section connects with lesson plans, higher education resources, online activities, and other resources.
Librarians will find this resource useful in history, social studies, and science classrooms. Students will find the exhibition easy to use and provides inspiration for extended activities. Teachers will find the lessons to be useful for both in-class and out-of-class assignments.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Website Review: The Living New Deal

THE LIVING NEW DEAL shares the achievements of the New Deal and public works projects across the United States.
This interactive online project features information about the New Deal, a map containing more than 12,000 locations impacted by public works projects, resources and teaching materials, and ways that people can get involved by submitting experiences and digital objects.
Librarians will find this website an engaging way to explore the impact of this government program.
To visit the website, go to https://livingnewdeal.org/.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Book Review: A Perfect Day

A PERFECT DAY by Lane Smith explores a perfect day for creatures living in Bert’s backyard.
A cat, a dog, a chickadee, and a squirrel are all having a perfect day until an unexpected visitor appears in Bert’s backyard. The unexpected ending will leave children smiling.
Librarians will find this book to be an effective read-aloud story. Use this adorable picture book to discuss the power of perspective with young children.
To learn more about the author/illustrator, go to http://www.lanesmithbooks.com/.
Published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan on February 14, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Website Review: Two Plantations

TWO PLANTATIONS tells the multi-generational story of 431 enclaved people living on two Virginia plantations in the 19th century.
This in-depth online project includes an interactive family diagram, detailed family trees, family lists, and analysis. Users can explore Sally Hurston’s family through four generations, examine family trees with biographical information, and explore a detailed list individuals.
Librarians will find this project provides an engaging way to help teens gain insights into the lives and families of slaves. Use family connections to help students better understand key issues related to slavery. The website provides some questions to get students talking. Use these questions to jumpstart a class inquiry using these plantations as examples.
To visit the website, go to http://twoplantations.com/.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Farm Security Administration Photographs

FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION PHOTOGRAPHS from the New York Public Library are a collection of over 2500 black and white images.
Contents: Users will find this collection of high quality, public domain photos easy to navigate and use. Choose from well-known photographs such as Dorothea Lange or search by topic for a wide range of fascinating photographs.
Classroom Connections: Connect these photos with works of historical fiction, history projects, or science projects related to drought and natural disasters. They’re also useful in projects related to the workforce and daily life in the mid 1930s through mid 1940s. These public domain photos can be used in student projects and shared online.

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Book Review: Animal Ark

ANIMAL ARK by Kwame Alexander and Joel Sartore celebrates animals through poetry and photographs.
This beautifully presented picture book focuses on quality over quantity. Each page contains an amazing high-quality photograph of a creature along with a short phrase. Together, these pages express the beauty and diversity of nature’s animal world through images and haiku. The book concludes with a description of National Geographic’s Photo Ark project, and a list of animals featured in the book, along with notes from the author and illustrator.
Librarians will find this book provides inspiration for projects focusing on endangered animals. Unlike many animal books that stress factual information, this picture book features the conservation and aesthetic side of nature.
To learn more about the author, go to http://kwamealexander.com/.
To learn more about the photographer, go to http://www.joelsartore.com/.
To visit the PhotoArk, go to http://www.nationalgeographic.org/projects/photo-ark/.
Published by National Geographic Children’s Books on February 14, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, July 14, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Expeditions & Discoveries

EXPEDITIONS & DISCOVERIES is an open collection from Harvard University Library focusing on exploration and scientific discovery in the modern age.
Contents: Spanning 1626 to 1953, this collection features historical resources in the areas of anthropology, archaeology, astronomy, botany, geography, geology, medicine, oceanography, and zoology. Users can search by discipline or region.
Classroom Connections: Teachers will find this collection to be an interesting way to connect science with history. Use a specific expedition to jumpstart a discussion of scientific discovery.
Featured Digital Objects:
Albatross Pacific Expeditions http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/expeditions/albatross.html
Peabody South American Expedition http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/expeditions/peabody.html
To visit the collection, go to http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/expeditions/.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Technology Review: Video Streaming Service

VIMEO is a video streaming service that stores and shares video files.
While most people are aware of YouTube, many web users are unfamiliar of a similar service called Vimeo. The website can be used two ways.
First, visitors can search for videos by topic or person. Millions of videos are available to view on a wide range of topics. Because many teachers use the website, it’s full of original, instructional content. Users can video videos, “like” productions, and add comments.
Second, users can create an account and upload videos. While limited storage is provided for free, advanced tools and features are available as part of their premium service. Similar to YouTube, users can organize their videos into playlists, follow friends, like videos, and create a personal profile.
Librarians will find this to be a useful alternative to YouTube. Consider creating an account for storing original productions such as how-to tutorials, student productions, and student-created book trailers.
To visit the website, go to https://vimeo.com.

Sunday, July 09, 2017

Book Review: Leave Me Alone

LEAVE ME ALONE by Vera Brosgol is a humorous picture book about a grandmother seeking a quiet place to knit.
This Caldecott Honor Book introduces an old woman who lives in a house with a large family. All the distractions make it difficult to knit, so she sets off on a journey to find a quiet place to work.
Librarians will find the predictable elements of this tale to be popular with young children. Reading the story aloud is likely to jumpstart conversations about family and personal space.
Published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan on September 13, 2016. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, July 07, 2017

Website Review: Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature

FRANKENSTEIN: PENETRATING THE SECRETS OF NATURE explores the history of individual and societal responsibility for other people.
Produced by the National Library of Medicine, the online project is divided into three sections: exhibition, education, and digital gallery. Each of the six areas of the exhibition includes a short narrative and fascinating primary source materials. The educational section features lesson plans, online activities, and other resources. Finally, the digital gallery provides access to a wealth of interested historical texts and images.
Librarians will find that students are attracted to the ethical and societal issues addressed in this online exhibition.

Monday, July 03, 2017

Website Review: Sea of Liberty

SEA OF LIBERTY is an interactive online exhibition tracing the influence of Thomas Jefferson’s ideas.
In addition to the digital collection, users can explore, create, and showcase their work. The explore section shares documents, letters, artwork, photographs and other materials related to the ideas of liberty, freedom, and self-governance. The create section encourages users to create digital projects that draw on the past. Finally, the showcase area allows users to see and learn from others.
Librarians will find that students enjoy the age-appropriate presentation of resources and information. The educational materials focus on teaching digital citizenship and historical thinking through primary sources. These concepts fit well with the standards for 21st century learners.
To visit the website, go to https://seaofliberty.org.

Sunday, July 02, 2017

Book Review: The Tree: A Fable

THE TREE: A FABLE by Neal Layton is a heartwarming story about animals and people living together in nature.
Although this picture book contains few words, it tells a powerful story of empathy and compassion. When a couple decides to build a house, they discover their land is already populated by animals. The couple decides to find a way to live with their new neighbors.
Librarians will find this timeless book provides an excellent springboard for creative writing activities focusing on empathy and nature. It would also be a refreshing way to introduce the idea of fables.
To learn more about the author, go to http://www.neallayton.co.uk.
Published by Candlewick on February 14, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, June 30, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Discovering Literature: Romantics and Victorians

DISCOVERING LITERATURE: ROMANTICS AND VICTORIANS from the British Library is a digital collection containing literary treasures and related resources.
Contents: This focused digital collection provides users with access to 1,200 Romantic and Victorian literary works, insights by 60 experts, 25 documentary files, and 20 teachers’ notes. A search tool can be used to locate specific historical materials such as diaries, letters, and photographs. Users can explore by author, work, theme, article, or video. A teacher resource section provides teaching ideas and educational materials.
Classroom Connections: English and history teachers will find this website to be a useful teaching resource.
To visit the collection, go to http://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians

Monday, June 26, 2017

Website Review: Fire & Freedom

FIRE & FREEDOM: Food & Enslavement in Early America examines how meals reflected the power structures of the time period.
The online exhibition is organized into six sections: introduction, commerce on land and seas, producing food/negotiating power, kitchen contradictions, labored meals, and freedom. The interactive narrative weaves in primary source documents to illustrate key ideas. During or after working through the exhibition, students can explore additional resources in the digital gallery. The education section provides resources for teachers including lesson plans, higher education resources, online activities, and other resources.
Librarians will find this resource to be useful for both students and teachers. Students will enjoy exploring the well-organized exhibition and teachers will find the education section useful for history class.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Native American Heritage

NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE from the National Archives provides a collection of photographs of American Indians taken in the 19th and early 20th century.
Contents: After a brief introduction, users can select from dozens of topics such as basketwork, burial customs, children, dances, hunting, and weaving to view sets of photographs.
Classroom Connections: Teachers will find these images useful in teaching about the history of National American culture.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Website Review: Navigating the Green Book

NAVIGATING THE GREEN BOOK shares travel guides from the mid 20th century that catered to black travelers along with interactive mapping activities.
During the mid 20th century, African American travelers weren’t welcome at many restaurants and hotels. The Negro Travel’s Green Book was intended to provide guidance for black travelers.
Part of the NYPL Labs, this interactive online experience provides access to travel guides published from 1936 through 1966. Users can explore the guides, map a trip, or view data on a map. For the map trip project, users choose a date and enter two locations. Participants are then presented a map showing a route featuring food, lodging, and other stops along the way. Each stop shows a primary source document.
Librarians will find this website to be a fun way to teach the use of primary source documents while connecting to history content. Associate the project with the Civil Rights Movement and issues related to segregation and travel. Work with teachers to design an interdisciplinary project that involves math, history, social studies, and English. Consider connecting the mapping element to works of historical fiction from this time period.
To visit the website, go to http://publicdomain.nypl.org/greenbook-map/.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Book Review: Everywhere, Wonder

EVERYWHERE, WONDER by Matthew Swanson and Robbi Behr brings the concept of “story” to life.
In this imaginative picture book, a young boy takes readers on a journey around the world sharing the amazing wonders around every turn. The illustrator’s appealing visuals bring each location to life using colorful collage elements.
Librarians will find this book to be an effective springboard into writing activities. Ask students to select some aspect of the book to explore in-depth. Or, just a page as the jumping off spot for creative writing activities.
Learn more about the author and illustrator team at http://robbiandmatthew.com/.
Published by Imprint, an imprint of Macmillan on February 7, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Medicine and Madison Avene

MEDICINE AND MADISON AVENUE is a digital repository exploring the rise of the consumer culture during the first half of the 20th century.
Contents: Housed at Duke University Libraries, this collection contains 600 health-related advertisements connecting modern medicine with the consumer culture. From cough and cold remedies to laxatives and vitamins, users can search by date, company, product, subject, publication, medium, or format.
Classroom Connections: Advertisements are an effective way to engage students with health and history topics. This digital collection can also be used to teach about marketing techniques and changes in society and culture during the 20th century.
To visit the collection, go to https://repository.duke.edu/dc/mma.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Technology Review: Vimeo

VIMEO is a video streaming service that stores and shares video files.
While most people are aware of YouTube, many web users are unfamiliar of a similar service called Vimeo. The website can be used two ways.
First, visitors can search for videos by topic or person. Millions of videos are available to view on a wide range of topics. Because many teachers use the website, it’s full of original, instructional content. Users can video videos, “like” productions, and add comments.
Second, users can create an account and upload videos. While limited storage is provided for free, advanced tools and features are available as part of their premium service. Similar to YouTube, users can organize their videos into playlists, follow friends, like videos, and create a personal profile.
Librarians will find this to be a useful alternative to YouTube. Consider creating an account for storing original productions such as how-to tutorials, student productions, and student-created book trailers.
To visit the website, go to https://vimeo.com.

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Book Review: One Proud Penny

ONE PROUD PENNY by Randy Siegel and Serge Bloch tells the story of the American penny.
Told from the perspective of a 1983 penny, this informational picture book describes the general history and uses of the penny along with details about one specific penny’s “life”. The book concludes with additional information and resources.
The mix of simple line drawings with collage features add interest to the story.
Librarians will find this to be an excellent addition to the social studies collection. This concept book would be useful in lessons focusing on government, money, and mathematics.
To learn more about the author, go to http://randolphsiegel.com/.
Published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan on January 10, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, June 09, 2017

Website Review: Digital APUSH

DIGITAL APUSH features AP U.S. History student projects that apply data from the Chronicling America Historic Newspaper collection.
For the past couple years, students in AP U.S. History in Sunapee, New Hampshire have been using the Library of Congress’ newspaper database to conduct historical research into a wide range of topics from questions. This website shares their projects.
Librarians will find this website to be an excellent way to introduce high school students to digital history projects that make use of online collections. Encourage students to build their own projects.
This project was a winner in the Chronicling America Historic Newspaper Data Challenge.
To visit the website, go to http://apush.omeka.net/about.

Monday, June 05, 2017

Website Review: Historical Agricultural News

HISTORICAL AGRICULTURAL NEWS is a website that helps users explore newspapers for information about agricultural topics.
This website allows easy access to newspaper articles from the Chronicling America collection at the Library of Congress. Users can narrow their search by organizations, grains crops, vegetable crops, livestock and dairy, fruit and nut crops, time, newspaper, and state.
Involve students in exploring the history of a particular type of agriculture through the lens of newspaper articles. For instance, explore sheep production in Montana, apple crops in Utah, or truck farming in California. Or, focus on the history of agriculture near the school.
To visit the collection, go to http://ag-news.net/.

Sunday, June 04, 2017

Book Review: Wolf in the Snow

WOLF IN THE SNOW by Matthew Cordell is a memorable nearly wordless picture book set in a snowstorm.
When a young girl gets lost in a snowstorm on the way home from school, she rescues a wolf cub. But who will rescue her?
Cordell’s simple illustrations effectively convey the solitude of wilderness life, the quest for survival, and universal compassion among all creatures.
Librarians are always on the lookout for wordless books to stimulate the imagination of their elementary students. This book provides endless opportunities for children to discuss animals, trust, and humanity.
To learn more about the author/illustrator, go to http://matthewcordell.com/.
Published by Feiwel & Friends, an imprint of Macmillan on January 3, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, June 02, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Contagion

CONTAGION: HISTORICAL VIEWS OF DISEASES AND EPIDEMICS is an open collection exploring Harvard’s history of medicine collection.
Contents: This large web project contains digitized copies of books, serials, pamphlets, incunabula, and manuscripts along with many visuals. In addition to searching the collection, users can also explore thematic collection related to cholera, plague, smallpox, flu, syphilis, tuberculosis, and yellow fever epidemics along with a notable person section.
Classroom Connections: Science and history teachers will find fascinating documents that bring the history of disease and epidemics to life. English teachers may incorporate these primary source documents into historical fiction literature circles.
To visit the collection, http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/contagion/.

Monday, May 29, 2017

Website Review: American Lynching

AMERICAN LYNCHING is a gripping cultural narrative website chronicling the dark history of lynching in America.
Featuring newspaper accounts from across the United States, this chilling project shares both well-known and lesser known histories of individual lynching events connecting media and race to American history. The website is divided into sections including overview, history, stories, and explore.
Users can examine sample documents, use a map to read statistics, explore history and data, search the records, or read more at the archives.
Librarians will find many teens interested in learning about this sad period of American history. Use this website to jumpstart discussions about public killings, reforms, and race in America.
To visit the website, go to http://www.americanlynchingdata.com/.

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Book Reviews: Fancy Party Gowns

FANCY PARTY GOWNS: THE STORY OF FASHION DESIGNER ANN COLE LOWE by Deborah Blumenthal is a picture book biography.
This beautifully illustrated children’s book tells that story of the first African American women to become a high-end fashion designer. As a child, Ann learned to sew from her mother and grandmother. After the death of her mother, Ann took over her mother’s commissions and later went to design school. Ultimately, she designed dresses for people like Jacqueline Kennedy.
Librarians know that it can be difficult to find biographies of interest to reluctant readers. Students interested in fashion design will be happy to find this book about a little-known designer.
To learn more about the author, go to http://www.deborahblumenthal.com/.
Published by Little Bee Books on January 17, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, May 26, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Historic American Sheet Music

HISTORIC AMERICAN SHEET MUSIC is a digital collection featuring sheet music of the 19th and early 20th century.
Contents: A Duke University Libraries collection, this resource includes digital images of over 3,000 pieces of music. Users can locate sheet music by composer, date, subject, instrumentation, illustrator, lyricist, publisher, and title.
Classroom Connections: Connect the music and social studies teachers for an engaging interdisciplinary project. Ask students to connect a piece of music to the time period when it was published. Use the subject search option to identify songs related to women, landscapes, entertainment, fashion, animals, society, transportation, and other interesting topics.
To visit the collection, go to http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/hasm/.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Digital Spotlight: American West Photographs

AMERICAN WEST PHOTOGRAPHS from the National Archives is a collection of images related to the westward movement of the 19th century.
Contents: After an introduction to the topic, users are presented with thirteen categories such as soldiering in the West, life by the sea, and towns of dust and rock. Users can also find resource by state.
Classroom Connections: Photographs are useful in helping young people visualize history concepts. Teachers will find these early photographs useful in teaching about this time period.
To visit the collection, go to https://www.archives.gov/research/american-west

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Book Reviews: Germs

GERMS by Lesa Cline-Ransome is an informational picture book exploring the world of germs.
This colorfully illustrated text describes the history of germs, the scientists who learned about them and the different types of germs. It stresses both the good and bad that germs do. The author’s conversational style and the illustrator engaging visuals will appeal to young readers. The book concludes with additional information and a glossary.
Librarians will find this informational picture book to be a useful resource to the science collection. It could also serve as a read-aloud book to introduce students to the science of germs. Ask students to learn about one of the diseases introduced in the book.
To learn more about the author, go to http://lesaclineransome.com/.
Published by Henry Holt, an imprint of Macmillan on January 10, 2017. ARC courtesy of the publisher.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Digital Spotlight: Everyday Life in Thailand

EVERYDAY LIFE IN THAILAND is a database of images representing life in Thailand.
Contents: This collection contains nearly 500 images and descriptions related to daily life in Thailand. Users can browse the images or conduct a search.
Classroom Connections: Librarians will find these photos are useful in teaching language learning skills or connecting to the culture of southeast Asia in the social studies curriculum.
To visit the collection go to http://quod.lib.umich.edu/l/lrc1ic.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Technology Review: Midomi

MIDOMI is a music website with an audio search tool, exploration options, and a singing feature.
Users can either do a word search for an artist, song, or album. One of the most interesting aspects of this music tool is the ability to “sing or hum” a tune. Simply sing or hum at least second seconds of a song like “you are my sunshine” and it identifies places on the web where that song is available. The website also contains a section where users can explore a wide variety of music by genre or language. Finally, users can try their skills at singing with the Studio Tool.
Librarians will find that young singers will enjoy the singing and humming options available. Teachers may find it a useful tool for locating specific songs or music in particular genre.
This music search and discovery tool is also available as an app called SoundHound.
To visit the website, go to http://www.midomi.com/.
To download the app, go to http://www.soundhound.com/soundhound.